Claudio Ethos: Killin’ it in San Paulo

Found out about this guy thanks again to unurth Street Art. Currently, working in San Paolo the complexity and abiding nature of his works are unique to say the least. As explained in Juxtapoz magazine the body of his work is “inevitably related to the struggle of day-to-day existence that Paulistas experience. Population density and the constant strain of urban anxiety become the subjects for many of Ethos’ narratives.”  Shout out to the one and only Travis Silvers who’s currently whylin’ out down in San Paolo.  Let me know if you see catch any of his works on the streets.

Claudio Ethos in Amsterdam + Sao Paulo – unurth | street art

Juxtapoz Magazine – Exclusive Feature on Claudio Ethos | Features

Ethos is quoted saying, “The binary states of consciousness (wakefulness and sleep) prompt in us a condition of temporary lucidity. In a series of paintings and drawings of one universe in relation to the other, the Insomnia collection shows us small breaches; letting out signs of this mutual influence between subconscious and its inability cease activity.”- well that makes sense. (Juxtapoz Magazine, 2009)

Also, be sure to check out Claudio’s main site at: The Art of Claudio Ethos

Or for for a profile on him: ArtSlant – Claudio Ethos

Advertisements

David Choe- A Los Angeles native and extremely versatile artist with graffiti roots

In 990, inspired by acclaimed graffiti artists Hex and Mear One, David began doing graffiti on bus benches, billboards and back alleys across the city.

To get an understanding on the incredible life and individuality of David Choe I strongly recommend checking out the documentary Dirty Hands: The Art and Crimes of David Choe. Obsessed with traveling, Choe has made one expedition after another, venturing everywhere from the jungles of the Congo to painting graffiti and murals around the globe, crafting a self-image and life history that’s an art piece in and of itself.

In 2007, he described his “dirty style” painting aesthetic to Fecal Face webzine, saying, “The dirty styles rule all other schools and styles. The layering, the personal touch to everything. I’m from the school of dirty styles, but it’s more than just style and surface, it’s every dirty thing that’s inside you.”

As he told Juxtapoz magazine, “I never stopped graffiti. It influences my fine art, with the quickness and immediacy of it. I use oil paint like it’s acrylic, because I can’t wait for it to dry. I love fucking with mediums and seeing how they react to different mediums, but I always considered graffiti separate from my art. I always looked at it as destructive, anarchist, political, spiritual, and mostly just fun. It was a release from being cooped up, hunched over drawing tiny drawings with rapidographs and mechanical pencils. Fuck everything I’m doing at home, I‘m going out late at night to have an affair with the streets. I’m not worried about mistakes, or trying to make shit look right, or fame, or writing a tag over and over—I’m looking to destroy, pure vandalism, and maybe somewhere in between the process I can achieve enlightenment, fulfillment, and redemption, but probably not. You can’t ever really describe the feeling until you’ve stolen two cans of Krylon flat black and hit the streets with reckless abandon. The freedom of speech, and scale of the words and pictures, is humbling.” (Juxtapoz Magazine, 2007.)

His trademark image of a sharp toothed whale is recognizable and can be found in many cities across the globe.

For more on David Choe check out this article: The Redemption of David Choe | Juxtapoz Magazine | Matthew Newton | Matthew Newton

And the Giants Win the World Series!!!

It was nearly a year ago that the culmination of all that is beautiful in sports occurred when the Giants won the 2010 World Series.  I can’t say enough about how incredible it was to watch that immaculate sports event come together.  The teams swagger and character, the come from behind play-off birth, the lincecum/halladay match-up, Wilson being a lights out time and time again, Renteria’s game winning home-runs in both 2 and 5, Cody Ross just being so clutch etc. etc. etc.  Having gone to Giants games my whole life by far the toughest part of watching the Giant’s World Series birth and eventual victory was having to watch it in Los Angeles and then missing the parade due to midterms f*%# my life right. god that sucked.  Anyways, one of my favorite timepieces that actually resides in North Beach of SF is a mural that perfectly encapsulates the general awesomeness of the Giants and that team.

On a similar note I’d like to share a letter that was written to the Giants by an incredibly talented blogger named Drew.  His site rocket-shoes.com is awesome and this post in particular really struck home when i first read it last year. A Love Letter To The San Francisco Giants

Check out this little video to get the full exposure of the mural:

Unique New York: The Enigmatic Basquait

Basquait began his career in art as a graffiti artist in NYC in the late 1970s, and in the 1980s produced neo-expressionist painting.  If you haven’t seen the feature film, “Basquait” that depicts the lifestyle and culture of the time for art in New York I strongly recommend it.  Anyways, I figured I couldn’t have this blog up for too long without paying tribute to one of the most uniquely foreign yet contrastingly humanizing artists ever to grace the streets with his work.  Basquait is often noted for his use of internal human anatomy in his works- apparently at age 7 he was given a book called Gray’s Anatomy by his mother and used it throughout his life as a reference for the various human anatomy he chose to depict.  Sadly, at the age of only 27, he died of a heroin overdose, yet still today he is celebrated as one of the most impactful U.S. artists of our time.  In 2002, his piece titled “Profit” was sold through Christies at a price of 5.5 million.

C215- This Parisian local is downright incredible

Christian Guémy aka C215 is best known as a French stencil artist. Based in Paris, he has been creating these distinguished stencils over the past few years and managed to build up quite a following in the process. C215 uses a wide range of color schemes, from muted tones to very vivid explosions of color as pictured below.

Check out his flikr photostream here to get a full sense of the types of works he’s capable of producing.C215’s Photostream

Amazing, right?

How and Nosm- Brothers with an intricate style

 

 

How and Nosm were just featured in the October issue of the Red Bulletin Magazine.  As fascinating and incredible as their artwork clearly displays, its also their unique lifestyle, living and working with one another constantly that makes them such an interesting duo.  The work speaks for itself but is often noted for its incredible intricacies.  Using a limited color pallet- black, white, and red brings outlines into focus and further reveals their meticulous patterns- putting worlds and characters within themselves. Down to the smallest details these brothers work day and night in a bronx warehouse producing these unbelievable masterpieces.

Check out their blog at: How and Nosm’s Blog | The Life and Work of How & Nosm

or

Check out their main website to take a look through their work: Artwork

 

Street Art Photos – Year 2010 | STREET ART UTOPIA

This site offers an incredible collection of street art.  Styles are extremely divergent between featured artists.  I like how they offer collections based on the year, month etc.  Gives a nice frame of reference for the piece.

106 of the most beloved Street Art Photos – Year 2010 | STREET ART UTOPIA – StumbleUpon.
Street Art Utopia also introduced me to a new artist by the name of David Walker.  I think he’s my new favorite.

david_walker_street_art_1david_walker_street_art_3_london

LA Canvas 80/20 event

Took a trip deep into downtown LA last night to go check out 80/20’s LA Canvas event.  Overall, I must say it was pretty awesome.  Incredible art, open bar, killer dj, and fun giveaways.  Not only did I get to press my own shirt (as seen below) but the show was also quite interactive.  I completed my first “tag” ever with a spray paint can, contributed to a Steve Jobs artwork by making a sad mac face haha, and got to watch some incredibly talented street artists develop their works in front of my eyes.

Overall, I’d say it was a great success.  have a look at the pictures below to get a feel for the event etc.